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5 Of The Spookiest And Abandoned Haunted Asylums

Published on 7 June 2022 at 17:11

dirty hospital beds

Abandoned asylums possess everything that's needed to make them creepy - cages for humans, rotten floors, and scattered vermin bones do the job just fine.

Any mental institution is full of bad energy, however, an abandoned asylum is something else. The screams of former patients are forever etched into the stone walls of what can only be described as a true hell on Earth.

After researching through the histories of some of the creepiest former asylums in the world, I have put together a list of 5 of the most haunted locations you do not want to go at night.

the rolling hills mental asylum hospital

Rolling Hills Asylum

East Bethany, NY

Rolling Hills Asylum was a place for the poor. Widows, orphans, handicapped people, criminals and alcoholics all ended up calling this place home.

The former Genesee County Poor House was established in 1827 and on record there are over 1,700 documented deaths. However, it is believed that hundreds more people were actually buried in unmarked graves around the property.

There are so many reports of Paranormal activity that is said to occur in the 53,000sqft building and this includes the voices of people screaming, doors slamming shut by themselves, and full blown apparitions.

The most haunted part of the building is known as the “Shadow Hallway”, and it is named this because of the shadow figures that peek out from doors, or shuffle and crawl across the corridor.

The most famous sighting of all is the spirit of Roy Crouse, a 7.5-ft giant who died there in 1942.

waverly hills sanatorium

Waverly Hills Sanatorium

Louisville, KY

With over 63,000 deaths taking place within the decaying walls of the Waverly Hills Sanatorium, this building is riddled with spirits, and it has become known as one of America’s most haunted locations.

It was originally built as a tuberculosis hospital in 1910, and Waverly Hills saw many of the patients there die from the disease.

Eventually tales of physical mistreatment, mental abuse and human experimentation trickled out. Most of the patients that died there left the premises in what was known as the “death tunnel”, or “body chute”.

Some of the spirits that are seen here include Timmy, a young boy who likes to play with rubber balls and has been captured moving them on tape. A nurse who hanged herself in room 502 and another one who fell from the same room’s window.

There are also numerous reports of screams, footsteps being heard and shadow figures seen lingering around the long and derelict hallways.

saint john's asylum

Saint John's Asylum

Lincolnshire, England

The hospital was opened as the Lincolnshire County Lunatic Asylum in 1852. It became known as the Bracebridge Pauper Lunatic Asylum in 1898 and Bracebridge Mental Hospital in 1919. It also served as an Emergency Hospital during the Second World War.

It is no wonder that patients had committed suicide inside this English asylum after known reports mentioned that staff members had mistreated their patients with painful procedures such as electro-shock therapy.

A well-known story is that of a patient who had hung himself at the top of a set of stairs within the asylum as he couldn't bare the treatments any longer.

Loud screams are often spoke of and a nearby pub has reported seeing the ghosts of nurses and patients roaming about.

The hospital closed in December 1989 and the site has been sold to a property developer who has since built 183 luxury homes and apartments there. The original hospital buildings are classified as Grade II listed buildings.

newsham park hospital orphange

Newsham Park Hospital

Liverpool, Merseyside

Newsham Park, was founded in 1874 and it officially had its doors opened on the 30th of September 1874 by the Duke of Edinburgh.

This one-time hospital and Seamen’s Orphanage now lies abandoned and ruined, with a growing reputation as possibly being one of the most haunted asylums in England.

In 1884 the orphanage had helped support over 800 fatherless children and around half of them had decided to take up residence inside the home.

When the nation was in conflict during World War 1 - it left thousands of children without any support, many of them had nowhere to go, so they ended up moving into Newsham Park Hospital.

The building is believed to be haunted, and the reports date back to when the asylum was actually an hospital. A female nurse would often talk about the ghosts she would see in the corridors but eventually she was found dead at the top of a staircase inside the asylum.

Patients would constantly speak about the children they could see, and psychiatric patients would often talk to people who weren’t there.

Disembodied voices are often heard and dark shadowy entities are often captured moving from room to room.

penn hurst asylum

Pennhurst Asylum

Chester County, PA.

Pennhurst Asylum was initially known as Pennhurst State School & Hospital, and it was founded in 1908, five years after its construction began. With 32 buildings and facilities, the asylum covered over 633 acres of Crab Hill in Spring City.

The Pennhurst complex was meant to be a safe refuge for the physically disabled and mentally ill people who often ended up in state hospitals and even prisons.

The asylum eventually closed its doors in 1987 after years upon years of allegations of patient mistreatment.

In recent times the Pennhurst Asylum was recently purchased by a businessman who has since turned it into a haunted attraction. This upset many people who believe that the site should become a memorial to the past, not a haunted location for profit.

When paranormal teams investigate this location children’s crying and even laughter can often heard echoing throughout the night, medical tools are moved about, and loud banging is usually heard.

There are even reports of conjuring and satanic worship taking place on the grounds of a place where negative emotions and fear once filled the halls of Pennhurst asylum.


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